A Feast for Wattlebirds

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…or maybe high tea?  I spotted a wattlebird sampling one of the growing grevilleas in the backyard and am so pleased to provide a food source for the local birds during winter.  I’m sorry I didn’t get to take a photo of this moment to share with you.  The wattlebird was nervous that I was there and shortly flew into the safety of the grevillea tree.

The beautiful red flowers of the grevillea are attracting wattle birds

The beautiful red flowers of the grevillea are attracting wattlebirds

You can see there are plenty of flowers to keep a few birds occupied.

The grevillea shrub is showing new green growth and plenty of red flowers

The grevillea shrub is showing new green growth and plenty of red flowers

The other shrubs in this garden bed are focusing on growing.

The tick bush has really settled into the garden

The tick bush has really settled into the garden

The tick bush has lovely soft growth and I can’t resist running my fingers over it as I walk past.

The banksia has dropped all of its leaves

The banksia has dropped all of its leaves

Sadly, the banksia has suffered.  I’m not sure if it has died or will show signs of life come spring time.  These photos from March show how many caterpillars found it delicious.  I picked them off to prevent more damage to the banksia.  Miss Z still remembers there were caterpillars there.

Mmm banksia, says the caterpillar

Mmm banksia, says the caterpillar

The caterpillars eat quickly

The caterpillars eat quickly

Curiously, nature has now planted something else in the pot with the banksia.  Does anyone know what this is?

A new plant is happily growing in the pot with the banksia

A new plant is happily growing in the pot with the banksia

It looks like it will flower soon too.  I’m inclined to leave it there to see what happens.

A closer view of the new plant

A closer view of the new plant

Next to it is the common mint bush, which will have purple flowers when it blooms.  If it keeps that shape as it grows, it may have room for some ground covers around it in future.

The common mint bush has an upright habitat

The common mint bush has an upright habitat

The rock correa is much more rounded.  It looks like it will fill this space well.

The rock correa is in the foreground

The rock correa is in the foreground

The other garden bed is blooming.

Flowering away

Flowering away

This is an existing shrub in the garden that I’ve seen in other gardens in the neighbourhood.  It’s drought-tolerant and provides some winter colour.

Another view of the shrub

Another view of the shrub

Its blooms are past their best now.

Colour during winter

Colour during winter

This shrub seems to flower for most of the year.  This is also an existing shrub and looks happy where it is.

The hardenbergia is showing its purple flowers and is now providing habitat too.  I have to keep an eye on this plant to train it to grow sideways instead of just up as it is a keen grower.  It’s wonderful to bring life, habitat and beauty to the garden.

A spider is resting on a web in the hardenbergia

A spider is resting on a web in the hardenbergia

How about your garden?  Do you have blooms in winter?  Has something you’ve planted brought in other visitors?  Or has nature decided what will grow in your garden?

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