Exploring Bushfood: Visiting Edendale Farm

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You may have seen my previous post on this topic, Exploring Bushfood: Visiting CERES.

Today I visited Edendale Farm with my family to have a look at the animals and see what they’re doing with edibles.

Edendale Farm sign

Edendale Farm sign

Edendale Farm is in Eltham, 24 kms north of Melbourne’s CBD, and is a community environment farm with a focus on education. It runs with the support of 35 volunteers and it looks like they do a great job. Here are some highlights:

Chooks with funny names

Hello Specky McGee, Speckle, and Mr Fluffy Pants

Hello Specky McGee, Speckle, and Mr Fluffy Pants

An amazing sculpture made with colourful children’s toys

A clever way of making art out of old toys

A clever way of making art out of old toys

Some curiosities in the reception area

It's hard to believe the brown part is an insect

It’s hard to believe the brown part is an insect

A turtle in the tank

A turtle in the tank

An example of a swale being used to grow food

Making use of a swale to grow vegetables

Making use of a swale to grow vegetables

And a vegetable spiral

Check out the gabions with repurposed waste

Check out the gabions with repurposed waste

And what of the indigenous nursery?

Me in front of the indigenous nursery

Me in front of the indigenous nursery

I found just one example of bushfood on display, but it looks like a strong contender.  Interestingly enough, it is a shade plant and produces small, edible berries.

Here is the native raspberry (rubus parvifolius).

Looks like the native raspberry is popular

Looks like the native raspberry is popular

And short summary of the plant

Native raspberry information

Native raspberry information

I’ll do some further research to make sure there are no surprises or anything that might cause an issue, but this would be nice if I could find the right shady spot on my garden for it.

Has anyone tasted this or grown it in their garden?

Given the size, it might even work in a trough-style planter.  Adding this plant would be a way to apply permaculture principle #10: use and value diversity.

That leaves Hurstbridge nursery and Victorian Indigenous Nurseries Co-operative in Fairfield on my bushfood nursery wishlist.

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