The Sugar Snap Peas Story

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As a follow up to my post about planting sugar snap peas with Miss Z, have a look at their wonderful growth!

April

Sugar snap peas with the pots for flowers in the background

Sugar snap peas with the pots for flowers in the background

Sugar snap peas with chillis growing in the background

Sugar snap peas with chillis growing in the background

May

Sugar snap peas climbing to the top

Sugar snap peas climbing to the top

June

The sugar snap peas have taken over the trellis

The sugar snap peas have taken over the trellis

Lots of flowers mean lots of sugar snap peas to come

Lots of flowers mean lots of sugar snap peas to come

In July and August, I was periodically adjusting the trellis as the weight of the sugar snap peas was tipping it over in the wind (permaculture principle #1 observe and interact).

In August, I managed a harvest that went straight into a stir fry dinner 🙂

Yesterday, Miss Z and I were picking more and this is how it looked.

September

The sugar snap peas after being munched on by lots of hungry snails

The sugar snap peas after being munched on by lots of hungry snails

But we still had lots to pick, thankfully!

Miss Z and I picked ample sugar snap peas

Miss Z and I picked ample sugar snap peas

There are a handful of peas still growing on the plants and we’ll see if we might manage to yield a bit more for the season.

Following permaculture principle #3 obtain a yield, I would definitely recommend growing sugar snap peas if they suit your climate.  They have grown very easily without much intervention, although I’d suggest not placing them next to a wall where the snails can climb up and feast 😉  They have lovely greenery and white flowers, and the peas and the pods are edible and taste crisp and fresh.  Nutritionally, they offer fibre, iron, potassium, folate, and vitamin C.

I’ll have sugar snap peas on our menu at home this week!